Convention Presentation Prizes

2017 Convention Presentation Prize Winners

Twenty-nine members of Alpha Chi, the national college honor society, received prizes for making the best scholarly, creative, or artistic presentations in their fields at the Society’s national convention in Louisville, Kentucky, April 6-8. The cash prizes were funded through discipline-specific endowments established by supporters of the society. Among almost 300 students making presentations, the following received prizes:

The Walden S. Freeman Prize in American History went to Stephanie Aram Smith from Grand View University for the presentation titled “An Unwinnable War: Harry J. Anslinger and the Origin of the War on Drugs.”

The Ellen Millsaps Prize in American Literature went to Warren Powers II from Chowan University for the presentation titled “The New Sorrow Songs.”

The Avery Grenfell Church Prize in Anthropology and Sociology went to Maria Jimenez and Mariana Osaki from Missouri Valley College for their presentation titled “Social Interactions Between Domestic and International Students in the U.S.”

The Alexander Bendazzi/Strayer University Prize in Art/Music/Dance Papers went to Christian Jessup from Gardner-Webb University for the presentation titled “New Music for a Galaxy Far, Far Away.”

The Robert Blake Prize in British Literature went to Sarah Spaulding from Carson-Newman University for the presentation titled “Powering Petruchio: Building a Case for Personality Disorder in The Taming of the Shrew.”

The Gayle Webb White Prize in Business Administration went to Tyler Martin Werland from the University of Texas at San Antonio for the presentation titled “Effective Leadership: How to Be an Effective Leader.”

The Joseph E. and Bessie Mae Pryor Prize in Chemistry went to Gia Storti from University of the Sciences for the presentation titled “The Synthesis and Examination of the Colligative Properties of Amphiphilic Hybrid Molecular Brushes.”

The Brown's Graduation Supplies Prize in Communication went to Gabriele Morgan from Bluefield College for the presentation titled “Keep Beach City Queer: The Language of Gender in Cartoon Network's Steven Universe.”

The Floyd Tesmer/Strayer University Prize in Computer Science and Engineering went to Anh Quynh Pham from Indiana Institute of Technology for the presentation titled “Developing a Primary Femoral Stem for Total Hip Arthroplasty.”

The Thelma Hall Prize in Creative Writing went to Bronte Pearson from University of Arkansas at Monticello for the presentation titled “Yellow.”

The Patricia A. Williams Prize in Education went to Melissa Whitwood from Midwestern State University for the presentation titled “Integrating Children's Literature in Elementary Math Methods: Fostering Understanding and Connections.”

The Milton L. and Avery Grenfell Church Prize in Environmental Science went to Jaspal Brar from University of the Sciences for the presentation titled “Plasma Treatment of Water: A Solution for Water Conservation and a Way to Promote Growth.”

The Jeanette Wieser Prize in Exercise Science and Nutrition went to Courtney Lynn Dees from Texas Lutheran University for the presentation titled “Effect of Expectation of Treatment on Perceived Pain in Injured Collegiate Athletes.”

The Kathryn Hoyle Bradley Prize in Health Sciences went to John Buttross from Christian Brothers University for the presentation titled “Quantification of Amyloid Beta Plaques in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models.”

The Bonnie Revelle Prize in Molecular and Cellular Biology went to Ashley Haught from West Liberty University for the presentation titled “Francisella tularensis May Utilize Iron Scavenged from Erythrocytes to Increase Survival in Low pH Environments.”

The Blake and Trish Janutolo Prize in Organismal and Ecological Biology to Lewis Wrenn Woodward from Chowan University for the presentation titled “Salinity Alters Behavior, Growth, and Development in Xenopus laevis Tadpoles.”

The Floyd and Rosana Tesmer/D.C. Gamma Prize in Original Visual Art went to Christiana Bays from Missouri Western State University for the presentation titled “Sushi.”

The Johnny and Frances Williams Prize in Performing Arts went to Chris Justice from Carson-Newman University for the presentation titled “Concerto No. 3, Movement I: Allegro Moderato by Carl Stamitz.”

Two Clark Youngblood Prizes in Philosophy and World Religion were awarded. They went to Hunter Edwards from Oklahoma Christian University for the presentation titled “Joshua and Judges: A Battle of Historical Accounts” and to Rebekah Rhea from Gardner-Webb University for the presentation titled “Are You My Lord? A Critical Analysis of Selected Religious Media for Children.”

The Ann C. and Avery G. Church Prize in Poetry went to Amber Morningstar Byars from the Institute of American Indian Arts for the presentation titled “Don't Call Me Indian.”

The Political Science/Economics Prize went to Danielle Casey from University of Central Arkansas for the presentation titled “Race, Republicanism, and Realignment in Arkansas: Analyzing Arkansas's Shift in Party Loyalty.”

Two Mary Waterstreet Prizes in Psychology were awarded. They went to Jasmine Brock from Harding University for her presentation titled “The Effect of a Scenario Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis and Teacher Experience and Professional Development Training on Perceptions of Appropriate Behavior Interventions”and to Merissa Milnickel from Anderson University for her presentation titled “Stretched Thin: The Effects of Media Exposure on Body Shame, Internalization, and Emotional Disclosure.”

The Patricia Graham Prize in World History went to Adam Lubbers from Abilene Christian University for the presentation titled “The Medicine of the Dead: The History and Causes of Early European Corpse Medicine.”

The Bill Short Prize in World Literature went to Valerie Kocsis from Abilene Christian University for her presentation titled “To Wring Tears from the Stars: The Suicides of Emma Bovary and Hedda Gabler.”

Matthew Brown from Hastings College won the presentation prize in the miscellaneous disciplines category for the presentation titled “Characterizing the Boundary Condition for a Water-Solid Interface under Applied Shear.”

The Dennis M. Organ Prize for the top presentation by a Graduate Student or Alumni Member went to Giselle Greenidge from University of North Texas for her presentation titled “Altruism and Trust: Can They Predict Remittances?”

Press Release